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Colorado Parks and Wildlife seeks comments on changes at San Luis State Park
10/26/2016
Credit:
CPW News Release
MONTE VISTA, Colo. Changes in the operation of San Luis State Park are being planned and Colorado Parks and Wildlife is asking the public to provide comments on management of the area.

Located in Alamosa County in the San Luis Valley, the park is used primarily during early summer as an overflow campground by those who cannot find a spot at nearby Great Sand Dunes National Park.

Management will now be done from CPWs Monte Vista wildlife office and it will now be operated as part of the San Luis Lakes State Wildlife Area. Previously, the park was managed by staff from Lathrop State Park near Walsenberg.

Nearly all property amenities, including camping spots for recreational vehicles, toilets, electric hook-ups and the waste dump station will continue to be available to visitors. Campground users will still be able to make reservations through the CPW website for the 51 campsites available at San Luis. The campground will remain open year around, and a host for the busy summer months will be hired.

The biggest change is that there will be no running water available at the facility. The old water system can no longer meet health standards for potable water. The cost to build and operate a new water system is too expensive given the low overall usage of the park. Users will have to bring their own water.
Vault toilets will remain operational.

Also, no firewood will be available for sale at the park.

San Luis Lakes, located on the property, will be open for boating and fishing if sufficient water is available. An ongoing drought has prevented the main lake from filling in recent years, and water hasnt reached the boat ramp since 2001. Water levels depend on winter snowpack and the amount of water that must be sent downstream to the Rio Grande according to interstate agreements Colorado has with the state of New Mexico.

Enough water, however, is available to maintain wetland areas on the north side of the park that provide outstanding habitat for waterfowl and various birds. CPW works to manage those areas to make them suitable for wildlife. Hunting is allowed around the wetlands.

CPW wants to hear ideas and opinions from those who use the park. Comments should be sent by Nov. 11 via e-mail to: dnr_cpw_planning@state.co.us.