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River: South Platte - Dream Stream
Fish: Snake River Cutthroat

Cutt bow or snake river cuttthroat?

Post By: Arvadaangler      Posted: 10/28/2018 9:18:57 PM     Points: 0    
When I first caught this trout, I thought it was a cuttbow, however, people on fishbrain have been saying it might be a snake river cuttthroat trout. Both of these species are in the dream stream where I caught it so Iím not sure. What do you guys think?
 Reply by: Budha      Posted: 10/28/2018 9:25:59 PM     Points: 160    
I agree with snake river.
 Reply by: SGM      Posted: 10/29/2018 6:11:31 AM     Points: 8732    
Look like cutbows to me. Very few snake river cutts left in the stream or mile.
 Reply by: 5points      Posted: 10/29/2018 6:47:57 AM     Points: 0    
 Reply by: team FMFO      Posted: 10/29/2018 7:16:37 AM     Points: 3843    
Looks like the Cutbows I catch in North Park.
 Reply by: Mr. Fly Fisherman      Posted: 10/29/2018 12:55:39 PM     Points: 148    
 Reply by: Smitty413      Posted: 10/29/2018 1:43:41 PM     Points: 108    
Nice catch! To my eye that looks like a cut-bow. The snake river cutthroats that I've caught had more yellow coloration and a larger spot count. I'm not a biologist though. :)
*Attached graphic is from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department
 Reply by: brookieflyfisher      Posted: 10/29/2018 2:55:53 PM     Points: 6121    
White tips on the anal, belly an/or dorsal fins indicates rainbow trout genetics, no matter how "cutthroat" the fish looks otherwise.

Your fish has white tips and cutthroat characteristics (spotting pattern, throat slash), indicating your fish is a hybrid.

 Reply by: bharper      Posted: 10/29/2018 3:37:15 PM     Points: 197    
Cutbow! This is a Snake River Cutthroat
 Reply by: yard dogs      Posted: 10/29/2018 3:42:47 PM     Points: 628    
I believe this is a Snake River Cut as well...
 Reply by: team FMFO      Posted: 10/29/2018 8:08:26 PM     Points: 3843    
Nice fish everyone !!!
 Reply by: Bwallace10327      Posted: 10/30/2018 7:43:34 AM     Points: 204    
The fine spots are a dead giveaway in IDing a Snake River Fine Spotted Cutthroat. These images are straight from the source.
 Reply by: brookieflyfisher      Posted: 10/30/2018 10:52:54 PM     Points: 6121    
The fine spots are not a dead giveaway. Cutbows and pure rainbows can have awfully fine spots. There are also parasitic organisms that cause fish to be covered in fine black spots...a phenomenon seen often on the Teton River and other high-productivity rivers in the West.

White tips are the only reasonable cue for telling if your fish is a hybrid or not.

All this back-and-forth really doesn't really matter much for the Dream Stream. the OP caught a nice fish, and it matters little if it's a cut, a rainbow, or a cutbow. It's a nice fish that was probably stocked by the CPW a few years back. But it matters a whole hell of a lot on the South Fork and other places where it's important to release the pure cuts and kill the cutbows to maintain breeding populations of pure cuts.
 Reply by: randog      Posted: 10/31/2018 12:40:40 PM     Points: 1649    
It's a rain throat. Will do brookieflifesher
 Reply by: Bwallace10327      Posted: 10/31/2018 4:58:57 PM     Points: 204    
It does matter the original post was asking what people thought and answers were provided. I never had the chance to fish the teton river, however the cutthroats from the snake river were/are Snake River cutts.
The fine spots towards the tail are a "dead giveaway" when iding a snake river cutthroat vs yellowstone vs rio grande vs colorado river vs green back. I think there are other factors to consider when comparing a snake river cutthroat to a rainbow, brown, pike, bass, tuna or shark.
 Reply by: brookieflyfisher      Posted: 11/1/2018 11:23:59 AM     Points: 6121    
Ah, I gotcha BWallace. It appears we were on separate pages of the same book.

Yes, you are 100% correct that the "snake river cutthroat" has finer spots than most other cutthroat species. Interestingly, depending on who you talk to, snake river cutthroat are either considered a separate species from Yellowstone Cutthroat (generally the position of WY fish and game) or are not considered a separate subspecies but rather just a color morph of the yellowstone cutthroat (generally the position of ID fish and Game and the Federal Government).

Native fish ecology is weird.

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