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Colorado Fish Species

Arctic Char
Arctic Grayling
Black Bullhead
Black Crappie
Blue Catfish
Bluegill
Bluehead sucker
Bonytail Chub
Brook Trout
Brown Trout
Channel Catfish
Colorado Pikeminnow
Colorado River Cutthroat
Common Carp
Creek Chub
Cutbow Trout
Cutthroat Trout
Emerald Shiner
Flannelmouth Sucker
Flathead Catfish
Flathead Chub
Freshwater Drum
Gizzard Shad
Golden Shiner
Golden Trout
Goldfish
Grass Carp
Green Sunfish
Greenback Cutthroat
Hybrid Striped Bass(wiper/palmetto)
Kokanee
Lake Chub
Lake Trout
Largemouth Bass
Longnose Sucker
Mountain Whitefish
Northern Pike
Orangespotted Sunfish
Pumpkinseed
Rainbow Trout
Redear Sunfish
River Carpsucker
Roundtail Chub
Rudd
Sacramento Perch
Sauger
Saugeye
Smallmouth Bass
Snake River Cutthroat
Splake
Spottail Shiner
Spotted Bass
Striped Bass
Sunfish (Bream)
Tiger Muskie
Tiger Trout
Walleye
White Bass
White Crappie
White Sucker
Yellow Bullhead
Yellow Perch
Yellowstone Cutthroat

Brook Trout
Brook trout are actually a char, in the same family as lake trout and bull trout.  Originally their range was limited to eastern North America, but through stocking programs they are now found throughout the west also. One of the more brightly colored char, they typically have a dark olive to blackish back transitioning to a whitish belly. Distinctive vermiform (wormlike) markings cover the back.  The lower fins have a distinctive white edge, bordered by black and the remaining fin being a reddish-orange.  Their sides have red spots, often with a bluish halo. These slender fish also have a square tail. While brookies are frequently viewed as a small fish, seldom getting much over 12 inches, the world record brook trout is more than 14 pounds.
 
Brook trout are fall spawners, generally in October and November. They seek riffle areas with gravel in streams, spring areas or shores currents for spawning. The females use their tails to sweep out a redd where she’ll lay 100 – 400 eggs. Brookie eggs require continuous oxygenation. Depending on water temperatures, the eggs will incubate 2 to 3 months before hatching. Compared to many fish, brook trout are sensitive as to their environment, requiring clean, cold highly oxygenated (50 to 60 degrees) water, be it streams or lakes.
 
Brook trout are voracious feeders consuming zooplankton, crustaceans, worms, fish, terrestrial insects, and aquatic insects. They frequently feed on whatever is most readily available. This feature makes them extremely popular with anglers and they will readily take a wide variety of flies and lures.


Brook Trout in Colorado

An entry to Colorado in the late 1800s, the brook trout feeds on aquatic and terrestrial insects and will rise to a large range of small lures, baits and flies. Brook trout have white spots (worm-shaped on top) on a dark background with tri-colored outlined fins (orange, black and white). This prolific fish often becomes overpopulated and can out-compete other trout. They are typically found in higher elevation lakes, beaver dams and streams.

Above Courtesy of Colorado Division of Wildlife 

Colorado Record 

Kept             7 lb 10 oz
Released    26 inches

Colorado Master Angler Award qualifying length for Brook Trout is 16"
 



Most Recent Brook Trout Forum Posts
The Mesa is gorgeous, good fishing 01.13.21 by Team CO.F.F.
Brookies through the ice! 12.11.20 by The Fishing Junky
Eating the Freshest Brook Trout 12.10.20 by Team CO.F.F.
Fall Brookies 10.09.20 by CoachK
Brainard Lakes & Brookies 08.24.20 by Forkin-Fish
Sheep creek 08.21.20 by GW fish
Brook Trout Articles, Blogs, & Podcasts
Blog: Unconfirmed Rumors? 05.26.19 by Mike McConnell
Blog: Early Ice Frenzy 11.28.18 by Dave Bryant
Blog: First Ice Trout 12.07.16 by Bernie Keefe
Blog: Fresh Water Drum 07.27.15 by David Coulson
Blog: Mud Mud Mud, The Ending 06.15.15 by Dale Daugherty
Blog: Mud Mud Mud 06.13.15 by Dale Daugherty
Blog: Filling Commitments 06.09.15 by David Coulson
Blog: Rocky Mountain High 06.03.15 by David Coulson
Blog: Early Ice Fishing Techniques 12.30.14 by Austin Parr
Blog: Fifteen, But Who’s Counting? – Oh, I Am! 10.17.14 by David Coulson
Operation Game Thief
Call to report illegal fishing/hunting:
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(1-877-COLO-OGT)
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